The most feared song in jazz, explained

The most feared song in jazz, explained

Making sense of John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps.”

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John Coltrane, one of jazz history’s most revered saxophonists, released “Giant Steps” in 1959. It’s known across the jazz world as one of the most challenging compositions to improvise over for two reasons – it’s fast and it’s in three keys. Braxton Cook and Adam Neely give me a crash course in music theory to help me understand this notoriously difficult song, and I’m bringing you along for the ride. Even if you don’t understand a lick of music theory, you’ll likely walk away with an appreciation for this musical puzzle.

Braxton Cook:
Adam Neely:

Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing.
Previous headline: Jazz Deconstructed: John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps”

Some songs don’t just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs.

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