Osage Orange Health Benefits in Description Tree Fruit Hedge Apple Horse Apple Maclura pomifera

Osage Orange Health Benefits in Description Tree Fruit Hedge Apple Horse Apple Maclura pomifera

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What it is, uses, where it grows, effectiveness in getting rid of bugs and history in the USA. This fruit grows in the USA mainly in Texas and southern Great Plains. Fruit from the Bois d’arc tree is called by different names like Osage Orange, Hedge Apple, Monkey Ball, Horse Apple. Maclura pomifera is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8 to 15 meters (30–50 ft) tall. The YouTube link for this video is:

Commonly believed to repel insects, a belief that began before insecticides to get rid of roaches.

Research has shown that compounds extracted from the fruit may repel insects.

In 2004, the EPA insisted that the selling M. pomifera fruits remove any mention of their supposed pesticidal properties as false advertisements. Therefore, there is no guarantee of results.

Here are user suggestions handed down to me from previous generations:

Hedge apples are used as a safe pest control alternative to toxic chemicals and have been thought to aid in repelling bugs for more than 100 years. A few of the insects that may be repelled are spiders, crickets, cockroaches and other annoying insects.

For quick results cut to allow juice to evaporate into the air to shoo bugs away.

Or use uncut as a decoration and allow to ooze slowly for longer lasting bug control.

Will last 1 to four months. Discard when fully black or place around outside foundation.

Seeds may germinate in spring if allowed soil.

When fruit gets about 3/4 dark there may be a faint scent.

Some find the scent attractive and others don’t.

Also used in crafts and unique home decor applications.

Leaves are attractive and have a slight gloss to them. A few leaves are usually attached, but not guaranteed.

Maclura pomifera is a deciduous tree.

The distinctive fruit is roughly spherical, bumpy, 3–6 inches in diameter, and turns a bright yellow-green in the fall. The fruits secrete a sticky white latex when cut or damaged.

Place on paper towels or plate.

Despite the name “Osage orange”, it is only very distantly related to the orange and is instead a member of the mulberry family.

Natural habitat–region all around Dallas, Texas (North Texas) to Austin Texas.

It was widely naturalized throughout the United States as a windbreak to stop soil erosion.

The fruit is not poisonous to humans or livestock, as shown by several studies.

However, it is mostly inedible due to its taste and its extremely hard texture.

Most animals do not like the taste either and avoid it.

The wood of the tree is considered everlasting because it can take a very long time to decompose.

Its use at fence posts is a long lasting example of its longevity.

Native Americans used parts of the tree as a cancer treatment and other health remedies.

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